baking · Goodies · My Life · vegetarian

My Homemade Bread!

Hey my Bright and Blooming Sunflowers! 🙂

Thanks for all of your comments on my last post of WIAW and on the family camp I attended. I had a lot of fun and am so grateful for the opportunity I had to go and hang out with my loved ones. 🙂

I promised a little while back on another post about my Homemade Bread. I’ve had a lot of practice with it since the first time I posted about it and had some hints and tips I’ve acquired throughout the years that I’ve wanted to share with you. I asked if I should just update my last post (and mess with that for a while to do so) or if I should do a new post. Many of you suggested I just do a new post.

So here it is: the updated version (with a little fun thrown in there too ;)).

Step-by-Step on how to make My Homemade Bread.

………………………………………………………….

(If you are going to grind your own wheat, do so now. I like to use my Whisper Mill to do this, fresh and ready to be used to bake.)


Measure out 4 cups of lukewarm water. I do this by turning my faucet to HOT and testing the temperature with my finger.


(This way I have more control over it than by microwaving it, and I know EXACTLY how hot it is because I can feel it myself.)


Pour the water into your mixer. (I use my smaller bocsh mixer with the kneading hook on it. (You can also use a Kitchen Aid appliance with a dough kneading hook. Or, if you’re okay with getting your hands dirty, you can do this by hand, pouring the water to a LARGE bowl – the bigger the better the first time you make it. You can adjust to a different size once you know how big the dough gets when making it. ;))


Add the yeast, honey, oil, salt, and optional crushed vitamin C tablet (this helps with the rising and preserving of the bread, as there are no artificial preservatives being added.) Stir them up a little bit.


Leave the mixture for 3-5 minutes, or until the yeast gets all puffy and foamy and “takes” over the surface. (Haha, it’s quite Caesar-like – likes to conqueror the whole “world” of the bowl. ;)) Letting the yeast do its thing also lets you check and see if the yeast is good. You wouldn’t want to make a whole batch of bread to find out after it baked that the yeast didn’t work. (I know from experience…)


Now start adding the flour.


I do it by ½ cup increments, adding more once it’s incorporated.


The dough will start getting sticky. Keep adding flour.


I also use a spatula on occasion to help the flour reach the back and sides of the bowl.


And then – I get my hands in there. It depends on the machine, but mine likes to let the dough “climb” up the hook, and so I get my hands in there to keep the dough from “getting away.” 😉


You know the dough is ready when it starts to pulls away from the sides. 🙂


Once the flour is incorporated (and the dough starts pulling away from the sides), put the lid on (if you have one) and let the machine knead it for 10-12 minutes. (You can also take the dough out of the machine/bowl and do this by hand on a floured surface. It’s a great way to get an arm workout in. ;))


In the meantime, (if you have 2 racks in your oven take the top one out) and set the bottom one to its lowest position. Preheat your oven to its lowest temperature. (Mine is 170 degrees F, which is about 75 degrees C.)

Get out four bread pans (I mean CANS!) Yep. I like my bread to “arise” and stand on its own. 😉 I use 48-oz size cans – they can be typically found in the juice section; I’ve found tomato juice and pineapple juice are some of the most common that are commonly sold in that size. Just use the juice up and keep the cans for some fun! You can also just use 4-5 bread pans (depending on their size) in place of the cans if that’s all you have.


Spray them with nonstick cooking spray. (Make sure to coat all side of it. I start with spraying the sides, and then finishing off with the bottom. You really want to make sure you coat it well, as the bread isn’t very fun to try to get out if it sticks.)


Clean off your counter, and lay out a small layer of flour.


Once the dough is ready,


Take it out and lay it on the thin “bed” of flour.


Gently spread the dough out in the shape of a square/rectangle. (You don’t want to mess with it much, or it can affect its rising.)


Cut it in half along the middle, and then cut each half in half, equaling four fourths. 🙂


Gently shape it in a ball (I like to put the flour side up, as it’s quite pretty after baking).


And gently drop the dough mound into one of the cans.


Repeat with the other three mounds.


Place the cans inside the oven, close the oven door. Turn off the oven, and let the bread rise in the oven for 30 minutes (or until the bread rises to the top of the can).


My mom’s favorite parts are the muffin tops the form on the tops with the bread rises up above the can. (Just don’t let it get too high, or it can start leaning over and fall down the side of the can.) Set the oven at 350 degrees F, or 200 degrees C, and bake for 30 minutes. (I don’t wait for the oven to preheat to 350 degrees F before I set the timer – I start the timer as soon as it starts preheating.)

Once the bread is done (You should start smelling it once it’s done), take the bread out. Using oven mitts, turn the bread upside down in the can and the bread should come out smoothly. (You may have to help it a little if it gets stuck.) Stand them up on a wire cooling rack and let them cool completely. (Or, if you don’t want to wait, carefully cut yourself – and the rest of your family 😉 – a slice, top with butter or honey or fruit preserves or nut butter or a delicious combination of multiple of them, and DIG IN! :D)


My Homemade Bread!

Makes 4 loaves

printer-friendly version

Ingredients

  • 4 cups warm water
  • 2 tbsp yeast
  • 1/3 cup oil (measure this one before the honey so the honey doesn’t stick to the measuring cup)
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • (optional) One 500 mg unflavored vitamin C chewable tablet, ground up
  • 9 ½ – 10 cups* whole wheat flour (freshly ground if available)

*The amount depends on the humidity outside. Drier climates take a little less, while more humid ones take a little more. Also have some flour available to knead the dough on the counter a little bit.

Directions

Get out all of your ingredients. (I grind my own wheat with my Whisper Mill, so if you are going to do so, do it now.)

Measure out 4 cups of lukewarm water. I do this by turning my faucet to HOT and testing the temperature with my finger. (This way I have more control over it than by microwaving it, and I know EXACTLY how hot it is because I can feel it myself.) Pour the water into your mixer. I use my smaller bocsh mixer with the kneading hook on it. (You can also use a Kitchen Aid appliance with a dough kneading hook. Or, if you’re okay with getting your hands dirty, you can do this by hand, pouring the water to a LARGE bowl – the bigger the better the first time you make it. You can adjust to a different size once you know how big the dough gets when making it. ;))

Add the yeast, honey, oil, salt, and optional crushed vitamin C tablet (this helps with the rising and preserving of the bread, as there are no artificial preservatives being added). Stir them up a little bit. Leave the mixture for 3-5 minutes, or until the yeast gets all puffy and foamy. Letting the yeast do its thing also lets you check and see if the yeast is good. You wouldn’t want to make a whole batch of bread to find out after it baked that the yeast didn’t work. (I know from experience…)

Now start adding the flour. I do it by ½ cup increments, adding more once it’s incorporated. Keep adding flour, (the dough will start getting sticky, but gradually get less sticky), using a spatula on occasion to help the flour reach the back and sides of the bowl.

And then – I get my hands in there. It depends on the machine, but mine likes to let the dough “climb” up the hook, and so I get my hands in there to keep the dough from “getting away.” 😉 Once the flour is incorporated (and the dough starts pulling away from the sides), put the lid on (if you have one) and let the machine knead it for 10-12 minutes. You can also take the dough out of the machine/bowl and do this by hand on a floured surface.

In the meantime, (if you have 2 racks in your oven take the top one out) set the bottom one to its lowest position. Preheat your oven to its lowest temperature. (Mine is 170 degrees F, which is about 75 degrees C.)

Get out four bread pans (I mean CANS!) I use 48-oz size cans – (they can be typically found in the juice section; I’ve found tomato juice and pineapple juice are some of the most common that are commonly sold in that size. Just use the juice up and keep the cans for some fun. You can also just use 4-5 bread pans (depending on their size) in place of the cans if that’s all you have.) Spray them with nonstick cooking spray. Make sure to coat all side of it. I start with spraying the sides, and then finishing off with the bottom. You really want to make sure you coat it well, as the bread isn’t very fun to try to get out if it sticks.

Clean off your counter, and lay out a small layer of flour. Once the dough is ready, take it out and lay it on the thin “bed” of flour. Gently spread the dough out in the shape of a square/rectangle. (You don’t want to mess with it much, or it can affect its rising.) Cut it in half along the middle, and then cut each half in half, equaling four fourths. 🙂 Gently shape it in a ball (I like to put the flour side up, as it’s quite pretty after baking). And gently drop the dough mound into one of the cans. Repeat with the other three mounds.

Place the cans inside the oven, close the oven door. Turn off the oven, and let the bread rise in the oven for 30 minutes (or until the bread rises to the top of the can — just don’t let it get too high, or it can start leaning over and fall down the side of the can.) Set the oven at 350 degrees F, or 200 degrees C, and bake for 30 minutes. (I don’t wait for the oven to preheat to 350 degrees F before I set the timer – I start the timer as soon as it starts preheating.)

Once the bread is done (you should start smelling it once it’s done), take the bread out. Using oven mitts, turn the bread upside down in the can and the bread should come out smoothly. (You may have to help it a little if it gets stuck.) Stand them up on a wire cooling rack and let them cool completely. (Or, if you don’t want to wait, carefully cut yourself – and the rest of your family 😉 – a slice, top with butter or honey or fruit preserves or nut butter or a delicious combination of multiple of them, and DIG IN! :D)


These loaves freeze REALLY well! Whenever I make a batch, I keep one loaf out to enjoy now and place the others in ziplock galloon-sized freezer bags and store them in the freezer. We pull them out when we need them, and it’s as if they were fresh out of the oven cooled, ready to be cut.

………………………………………………………………

I’ll be making another batch of this tomorrow, so if you have any question for me on making this just ask me below. The process will be fresh in my mind, and I’d love to help in any way I could! 🙂

How do you like to top a slice of freshly baked, hot out-of-the-oven bread?

I love frosting it with homemade nut butter (as it nut butter just melts on top and is amazing!) or with smart balance lite buttery spread with homemade preserves. Yum yum yum.

What are some of your goals this coming school year?

I hope to finish up my Old Testament, do a few courses online before I head up to Idaho in January, read a few of the classics (I just finished Around The World In 80 Days yesterday afternoon!), hopefully get my license (though I may have to wait till I’m 18… I don’t know if my parents want me to get it until after I come back from my first year of college; I won’t be driving up in Idaho anyways, so I guess it won’t be SO bad if I have to wait), and keep preparing for college. 🙂

xoxox,


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9 thoughts on “My Homemade Bread!

  1. Your bread is SO GOOD! I remember making it the first time you posted, but I used quick yeast and some other substitutions. My parents loved it and were so impressed with me 🙂 Haha. And my dad’s favorite part are the ends, as are my mine!

    My question really has nothing to do with your bread recipe, but have you ever tried making gluten-free bread? I have before with yeast, and it was pretty successful. I was just curious if you had ever tried making a non-yeast bread before, for sandwiches and such?

  2. Thanks for the step-by-step recipe, Kat, this looks do-able and so delicious! I love that the bread is round… it reminds me of that Spongebob episode where Squidward finds canned bread in a grocery store. 😛 😛

  3. Hi Kathleen
    🙂
    My name is Elen and I’m brazilian
    I have been living in Canada ( Toronto) and this week I’m going to start my College here 🙂
    My course is Culinary Management Nutrition,because I have a passion for eating healthy 🙂
    I love your blog and your bread! I love homemade bread 🙂
    Nice to meet you
    ps> Sorry about my English..lol

  4. How VERY UNIQUE!! I make my own bread quite often…There’s nothing quite like the smell of rising bread…The yeast is absolutely intoxicating! Not to mention the feeling of pride that comes with knowing you made something so beautiful…In our day in age I believe we NEED to get back to our roots of making things on our own, with our own hands, in our own kitchens! It makes us appreciate things more.

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