baking · My Life · vegetarian

Copy-cat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread

I love the sun. I love how it can shine and warm me up when I feel down. I love how steadfast it is, sparkling through the clouds, through the breeze, through the trees, continuously lighting up the day. I love how even a little sunshine can make a dreary day feel a little nicer. Some days are just plain rainy, but I love how the sun can come out and paint rainbows throughout the sky on those days.

It was on one of those sunshine days that I had a little fun in my kitchen, baking bread and singing-along to Disney songs (my favorites are Mulan, Tangled, the Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, and Tarzan). Singing makes baking even more fun. 🙂

Today I made a special treat, and I wanted to share it with you! This is another recipe with only a few ingredients – five in all! That’s it! And you get a delicious treat to share. ❤

What is it?


My Copy-cat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread!


Measure out the water. I like to turn my faucet onto hot/warm and check the temperature with my hand before I measure it so I know it is very warm. (I don’t want it too hot though, or it can kill the yeast.)


After the water is warm enough and you’ve measured the amount of water, pour it into a bowl and add the honey, yeast, and salt.


Let it rest for 5 minutes, or until the yeast foams. (If the mixture foams it means the yeast is working! It’s important to wait and see if the yeast is working so the bread turns out well.)


Once the yeast has done its thing, add the flour 1 cup at a time,


Kneading it in along the way.


I like doing this by hand (it’s an amazing arm workout – I feel it in every arm muscle afterwards), but you can also use the paddle attachment on a Bosch or a Kitchen Aid mixer.


Knead for approximately 5 minutes.


The dough will be very sticky, but only add enough flour so the dough barely pulls away from the bowl.


The amount you’ll end up using also depends on the humidity and elevation of where you are.


Sometimes I am just fine with 10 cups, but other times I have had to add 11 cups.


Pre-heat oven to 170*F;


Turn the oven off, and let dough rise inside the oven for 15 minutes.


Carefully remove bowl from oven. Spray the back of your hand with cooking spray and punch down the dough.


Form into a log and cut in half, forming two larger-sized loaves.


Put into greased loaf pans.


Again pre-heat oven (if it’s not warm anymore) to 170*F, and let the dough in the pans rise in the oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size.


Set oven temperature to 350*F, and then bake the loaves for 30 minutes. Remove from pans immediately and let cool completely on a cooling rack.


Copy-Kat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups very warm water
  • 3 Tbsp. fast active-dry yeast*
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 1 tbsp. salt
  • 10-11 cups whole wheat flour (freshly ground if possible)

Directions:

  1. Measure out the water. I like to turn my faucet onto hot/warm and check the temperature with my hand before I measure it so I know it is very warm. (I don’t want it too hot though, or it can kill the yeast.) After the water is warm enough and you’ve measured the amount of water, pour it into a bowl and add the honey, yeast, and salt. Let it rest for 5 minutes, or until the yeast foams. (If the mixture foams it means the yeast is working! It’s important to wait and see if the yeast is working so the bread turns out well.)
  2. Once the yeast has done its thing, add the flour 1 cup at a time, kneading it in along the way. I like doing this by hand (it’s an amazing arm workout – I feel it in every arm muscle afterwards), but you can also use the paddle attachment on a Bosch or a Kitchen Aid mixer.
  3. Knead for approximately 5 minutes. The dough will be very sticky, but only add enough flour so the dough barely pulls away from the bowl. (The amount you’ll end up using also depends on the humidity and elevation of where you are. Sometimes I am just fine with 10 cups, but other times I have had to add 11 cups.)
  4. Pre-heat oven to 170*F; turn the oven off, and let dough rise inside the oven for 15 minutes.
  5. Carefully remove bowl from oven. Spray the back of your hand with cooking spray and punch down the dough. Form into a log and cut in half, forming two larger-sized loaves. Put into greased loaf pans.
  6. Again pre-heat oven (if it’s not warm anymore) to 170*F, and let the dough in the pans rise in the oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size.
  7. Set oven temperature to 350*F, and then bake the loaves for 30 minutes.
  8. Remove from pans immediately and let cool completely on a cooling rack.

*Notes:

  1. I’ve always been interested at what the difference between regular yeast and fast-active dry yeast was, so I checked the ingredients one day and was pleasantly surprised! The only difference between them is that the fast-active dry yeast has vitamin C added to it! So what my bread-making mentor taught me all those years ago was very true! So, if you don’t have any fast-active dry yeast, just add a ground-up vitamin C tablet. (You can also use fast active-dry yeast in place of the yeast and vitamin C in my other bread recipe.)
  2. If you have any leftover freshly ground flour, store the remaining flour in the freezer — this helps preserve the nutrients longer.

Print This!

I don’t know if this particular method or specific ingredient ratio is what Great Harvest uses for their Honey Whole Wheat Bread, but this version tastes almost indistinguishable to the one they make. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family and I do!

with lots of hugs,

Kathleen

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12 thoughts on “Copy-cat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread

  1. I haven’t made homemade sandwich bread in such a long time because of my wheat allergies. But I have quite a few family members (namely my brother) who I could make this for. And I love how homemade bread has SO many less ingredients than the ones in the store. This one slices so nicely! And has a good rise. Great recipe. I will be trying it hopefully soon.

    1. Thanks Madison! You’re always so sweet in your comments. 🙂 If you end up making it for your family, let me know — I’d love to hear their feedback on it. :)

      Btw, I’m determined to come up with a few recipes you can eat! What are your specific intolerances right now?

  2. My sister always made a beautiful whole wheat bread by soaking the wheat flour overnight in most of the required liquid. Next day she would dissolve the yeast in a bit of liquid and add it to the dough before kneading it. I wonder if this is how Great Harvest comes up with such good bread! I am going to try this technique! My sister said the wheat flour needs time to soak up the liquid to make the bread light.

  3. I just made this and didn’t expect to like it…I never made bread before, I only had enough flour to make one loaf, I have little packets of yeast so I just winged it and used one packet instead of 1 1/2 tablespoons (for one loaf), and making it was so easy that I was SURE I did something wrong. But I just cut myself a slice, still hot from the oven…and it’s SO good!! To be honest, I don’t usually even like whole wheat bread…but I’m trying to make healthier choices. I love this bread!!! I thought making bread involved lots of kneading, hours of rising, tons of patience… You proved me wrong. Thanks so much for this fantastic recipe! It was fun and easy to make, tastes great, and is healthy. That’s a win-win-win!

  4. Just curious….I make a loaf of bread in breadmaker. The recipe only take 4 cups of flour and very little water (no egg). What is the difference in why this loaf takes 10 cups of flour? Thanks for any infor..

    1. How large of a loaf does your bread maker make? This recipe makes two loaves of bread, which could be the reason your recipe calls for about half the amount of flour.

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