baking · vegan

Honey Whole Wheat Bread

The smell of freshly baked bread fills the entire house. 

It draws everyone from upstairs to come join in the feast.

I don’t buy bread from the store any more.

With this recipe, I don’t need to.

This recipe is a combination of previous recipes, but through time and experience, I have perfected the process. My favorite part: this simple recipe only requires 30 minutes of preparation, and the dough rises and bakes in the oven in less than an hour.

It is also versatile, as it can be made in a Bosch or by hand. It can also be baked as loaves or rolls. It can also work as pizza crust or rolled up into cinnamon rolls.

Several families have begged me to share how I make my bread. So tonight I sat down and typed up the directions to share with you! I have tried to explain the process and add my tips along the way. Please contact me if you have any questions. I would love to hear your experiences making it! 

FullSizeRender (1)

HONEY WHOLE WHEAT BREAD

Prep: 20-30 minutes. Rise time: 30-60 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes. Total time: 1 hour 30 minutes to 2 hours.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups water
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 3 Tbsp. fast active-dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp. salt
  • 10-11 cups* whole wheat flour

Directions:

For the Bosch machine:

  1. Turn on your water faucet to warm/hot. I check the temperature with my hand before I measure out the water for the bread. You don’t want it too hot though, or it can kill the yeast.
  2. After the water is warm enough, measure out the water, pour it into the Bosch bowl, and add the honey, yeast, and salt. Turn the Bosch machine on for a few seconds to mix ingredients. Let it rest for 3-5 minutes, or until the yeast begins to foams. (If the mixture foams it means the yeast is working! It’s important to wait and see if the yeast is working so the bread turns out well.)
  3. Turn on the Bosch machine to speed 1. Add the flour 1 cup at a time, allowing the Bosch to incorporate it in along the way. You know you have added just enough flour when the dough starts to pull away from the sides. (You can also turn off the machine, use a spatula to scrape off the sides, and turn on the machine again and see if the dough sticks to the sides of the bowl again. If so, add just a little more flour.)
  4. Pre-heat oven to the lowest heat setting (around 170°F).
  5. While oven is preheating, Divide the dough: spray the counter table with non-stick cooking spray. Lay dough on the sprayed counter, and divide into 4-5 smooth mounds. Place into greased loaf pans.
  6. Place dough into preheated oven, and turn off the oven. Let the dough rise in the oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size.
  7. Set oven temperature to 350°F, and then bake the loaves for 30 minutes.
  8. Remove from pans immediately and let cool completely on a cooling rack.

Make by Hand: (best if made as rolls)

  1. Turn on your water faucet to warm. I check the temperature with my hand before I measure out the water for the bread. You don’t want it too hot though, or it can kill the yeast.
  2. After the water is warm enough, measure out the water, pour it into the largest bowl you have. (This will help prevent making a mess on the counter….) Add the honey, yeast, and salt. Let it rest for 3-5 minutes, or until the yeast begins to foams. (If the mixture foams it means the yeast is working! It’s important to wait and see if the yeast is working so the bread turns out well.)
  3. Once the yeast has done its thing, add the flour 1 cup at a time, kneading it in along the way. Knead for approximately 5-10 minutes. (I find that when making the dough by hand, it’s better to use less flour than more.) The dough will be very sticky, but only add enough flour so the dough barely pulls away from the bowl. You can spray your hand with oil to help you knead the dough.
  4. Pre-heat oven to the lowest heat setting (around 170°F). Turn off oven, and place dough in a large oven-safe bowl and let rise in oven for 20-30 minutes. Keep an eye on it, or it can overflow the container.
  5. Spray the counter table with non-stick cooking spray. Take out dough, and punch it down.
  6. Lay dough on the sprayed counter, and divide dough into 4-5 smooth mounds. (I use my hands to smooth it out and pinch the bottoms together.) Place into greased loaf pans.
  7. Place dough into preheated oven, and turn oven off. Let the dough rise again in the oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size. (Be patient! The timing can vary based on elevation, humidity, etc.)
  8. Set oven temperature to 350°F, and then bake the loaves for 30 minutes.
  9. Remove from pans immediately and let cool completely on a cooling rack.

Make into rolls:

FullSizeRender (2)

  1. Make dough either in Bosch machine (steps 1-4) or by hand (steps 1-5) and pre-heat oven.
  2. Separate dough into balls: golf-ball size for smaller rolls, or tennis-ball size for larger rolls for hamburger buns. Place rolls on greased baking sheets (I use anywhere from 5-6).
  3. Place in oven on warm setting to rise for 20 minutes, or until double in size. Turn on oven to 350°F and bake for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly golden brown.
  4. Let cool on pans. Store in plastic bags.

Notes:

  1. Freshly ground flour is preferable. If you have any leftover freshly ground flour, store the remaining flour in the freezer — this helps preserve the nutrients longer.
  2. I prefer using WHITE whole wheat instead of red whole wheat. It results in a lighter, softer bread.
  3. You can also add a crushed Vitamin C tablet to help the bread’s texture. The yeast I get has vitamin C in it, so I don’t always add the crushed vitamin C tablet to the bread.
  4. *The amount of flour you use will depend on the climate, humidity and elevation of the place you live. I use less flour when making it by hand than when I make it in the Bosch.
  5. You can either make an entire batch of bread in rolls, or you can do half-and-half loaves and rolls. Just keep an eye on the rolls when baking both together, as the rolls will cook faster.
  6. Bread will cook faster in metal pans than in glass pans, and it will turn golden brown faster than when baked in glass pans.
  7. This bread stores really well in the freezer when kept in Ziploc Freezer plastic gallon baggies. When you finish a loaf, take another out of the freezer and let it thaw for a few hours before cutting.
  8. Nutritional facts in printer-friendly version.
Print This Recipe!

What is your favorite spread on sandwiches?

I’m a girl who loves her peanut butter! I also like hummus with this bread.

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baking · My Life · vegetarian

Copy-cat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread

I love the sun. I love how it can shine and warm me up when I feel down. I love how steadfast it is, sparkling through the clouds, through the breeze, through the trees, continuously lighting up the day. I love how even a little sunshine can make a dreary day feel a little nicer. Some days are just plain rainy, but I love how the sun can come out and paint rainbows throughout the sky on those days.

It was on one of those sunshine days that I had a little fun in my kitchen, baking bread and singing-along to Disney songs (my favorites are Mulan, Tangled, the Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, and Tarzan). Singing makes baking even more fun. 🙂

Today I made a special treat, and I wanted to share it with you! This is another recipe with only a few ingredients – five in all! That’s it! And you get a delicious treat to share. ❤

What is it?


My Copy-cat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread!


Measure out the water. I like to turn my faucet onto hot/warm and check the temperature with my hand before I measure it so I know it is very warm. (I don’t want it too hot though, or it can kill the yeast.)


After the water is warm enough and you’ve measured the amount of water, pour it into a bowl and add the honey, yeast, and salt.


Let it rest for 5 minutes, or until the yeast foams. (If the mixture foams it means the yeast is working! It’s important to wait and see if the yeast is working so the bread turns out well.)


Once the yeast has done its thing, add the flour 1 cup at a time,


Kneading it in along the way.


I like doing this by hand (it’s an amazing arm workout – I feel it in every arm muscle afterwards), but you can also use the paddle attachment on a Bosch or a Kitchen Aid mixer.


Knead for approximately 5 minutes.


The dough will be very sticky, but only add enough flour so the dough barely pulls away from the bowl.


The amount you’ll end up using also depends on the humidity and elevation of where you are.


Sometimes I am just fine with 10 cups, but other times I have had to add 11 cups.


Pre-heat oven to 170*F;


Turn the oven off, and let dough rise inside the oven for 15 minutes.


Carefully remove bowl from oven. Spray the back of your hand with cooking spray and punch down the dough.


Form into a log and cut in half, forming two larger-sized loaves.


Put into greased loaf pans.


Again pre-heat oven (if it’s not warm anymore) to 170*F, and let the dough in the pans rise in the oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size.


Set oven temperature to 350*F, and then bake the loaves for 30 minutes. Remove from pans immediately and let cool completely on a cooling rack.


Copy-Kat Great Harvest Honey Whole Wheat Bread

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups very warm water
  • 3 Tbsp. fast active-dry yeast*
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 1 tbsp. salt
  • 10-11 cups whole wheat flour (freshly ground if possible)

Directions:

  1. Measure out the water. I like to turn my faucet onto hot/warm and check the temperature with my hand before I measure it so I know it is very warm. (I don’t want it too hot though, or it can kill the yeast.) After the water is warm enough and you’ve measured the amount of water, pour it into a bowl and add the honey, yeast, and salt. Let it rest for 5 minutes, or until the yeast foams. (If the mixture foams it means the yeast is working! It’s important to wait and see if the yeast is working so the bread turns out well.)
  2. Once the yeast has done its thing, add the flour 1 cup at a time, kneading it in along the way. I like doing this by hand (it’s an amazing arm workout – I feel it in every arm muscle afterwards), but you can also use the paddle attachment on a Bosch or a Kitchen Aid mixer.
  3. Knead for approximately 5 minutes. The dough will be very sticky, but only add enough flour so the dough barely pulls away from the bowl. (The amount you’ll end up using also depends on the humidity and elevation of where you are. Sometimes I am just fine with 10 cups, but other times I have had to add 11 cups.)
  4. Pre-heat oven to 170*F; turn the oven off, and let dough rise inside the oven for 15 minutes.
  5. Carefully remove bowl from oven. Spray the back of your hand with cooking spray and punch down the dough. Form into a log and cut in half, forming two larger-sized loaves. Put into greased loaf pans.
  6. Again pre-heat oven (if it’s not warm anymore) to 170*F, and let the dough in the pans rise in the oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size.
  7. Set oven temperature to 350*F, and then bake the loaves for 30 minutes.
  8. Remove from pans immediately and let cool completely on a cooling rack.

*Notes:

  1. I’ve always been interested at what the difference between regular yeast and fast-active dry yeast was, so I checked the ingredients one day and was pleasantly surprised! The only difference between them is that the fast-active dry yeast has vitamin C added to it! So what my bread-making mentor taught me all those years ago was very true! So, if you don’t have any fast-active dry yeast, just add a ground-up vitamin C tablet. (You can also use fast active-dry yeast in place of the yeast and vitamin C in my other bread recipe.)
  2. If you have any leftover freshly ground flour, store the remaining flour in the freezer — this helps preserve the nutrients longer.

Print This!

I don’t know if this particular method or specific ingredient ratio is what Great Harvest uses for their Honey Whole Wheat Bread, but this version tastes almost indistinguishable to the one they make. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family and I do!

with lots of hugs,

Kathleen

baking · chocolate · My Life · peanut butter

Coolest Shaved Ice Truck EVER! + Wisdom Teeth

This past week you could catch me:

Baking cupcakes, cookies, and bread.


I made these into the shape of a wedding dress.


And mini rainbow-colored cupcakes. They were so adorable!


I also made Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Bars, along with my sister’s request of “Pink Cookies.”


But my favorite one has been my Great-Harvest-Inspired Honey Whole Wheat Bread. And yes, it tastes just like it but costs a lot less. Perfect for this money-pinching time in society. Don’t worry, I’m working on the post right now. 😉


Seeing cool shaved ice trucks! Earlier this week my sister heard Jamaican music outside, ran to the window and spied this shaved ice truck driving around our neighborhood!


Excited, she hurriedly called me from upstairs to come and see the new truck in our neighborhood. When I got downstairs, I couldn’t believe my eyes! It was a paradise on wheels, playing Jamaican jamborees and serving colorful ices! It was legit! Simply the coolest shaved truck EVER! 😀

Painting notebooks.


Shopping at thrift stores. I got 14 new skirts and 1 blouse for only $70!!! Gosh I love thrift stores. ❤


And I found the Keira Knightley version of Pride and Prejudice at Target for only $5.

I HAD to get it. I ❤ Darcy. 

And getting stuff done that has to happen whether I want to or not… I went to the oral surgery center at the military AFB Monday morning for a wisdom teeth evaluation. They took me right in, got some x-rays, explained the process, and scheduled me to have all my wisdom teeth removed on the 28th, this coming Monday!


We went to the grocery store yesterday and picked up a couple of things for next week after my surgery. Right now I have organic soy-milk, almond milk, green smoothies, water, broth, soy yogurt, butternut squash soup, and applesauce. I’m guessing I’ll be living on a lot of liquids next week, with more creamy stuff later in the week or the week after. I’ll see how I feel after the procedure next week.

Any tips for when I have my wisdom teeth removed? Anything I should know before the procedure Monday morning?

I could use with all the help I could get… I don’t do well with needles or surgical stuff… And they’ll be giving me an I.V. and a pill to make me less aware of what is going on… Mine are all still underneath my gums and haven’t erupted at all, so I don’t know how long the surgeon will take doing it. I know I can’t use straws and have to use a lot of mouth wash since I can’t brush my teeth until the gums heal. I don’t know a lot other than that.

With lots of hugs,

Kathleen